Dream Paintings and Society6

I have uploaded some paintings done by the Old Me Way Back When onto Society6.

These are from a series I made call Postcards from the Other Side Of Sleep, they were all inspired by dreams I had at the time.

After some research it appeared to me that Society6 seemed like the perfect place for a time strapped part-time artist to get their work out into the world.

All their products are of high quality and I get a little percentage for each sale made.

I will be making some signed prints of these in due course which I will sell directly and therefore get payed slightly more.

In the meantime please take a look at my store on Society6 and if you don’t feel like buying anything but have an account, a few likes here or there would mean the world, raise profile and would be rewarded with kind thoughts.

 

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Owls Over The Stock Exchange
LizardeSeesOilSPots_001_2K
Lizarde Sees Oil Spots In The Sky
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Sailing On The Sea of Na-Gig
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Fresco For A Red Dream Cathedral

The future, in fiction, is a metaphor.

“All fiction is metaphor. Science fiction is metaphor. What sets it apart from older forms of fiction seems to be its use of new metaphors, drawn from certain great dominants of our contemporary life—science, all the sciences, and technology, and the relativistic and the historical outlook, among them. Space travel is one of these metaphors; so is an alternative society, an alternative biology; the future is another. The future, in fiction, is a metaphor.

A metaphor for what?

If I could have said it non-metaphorically, I would not have written all these words, this novel…”

 –  Ursula K. Le Guin, 1976 Foreword to The Left Hand of Darkness (via Nearlya)

Bloglovin

Follow my blog with Bloglovin if you like that sort of thing.

Since the very sad and untimely demise of Google Reader I have been using Feedly to read and sort the large amount of blog and RSS feeds I follow.

But still I missed the hive mind collaborative and interactive nature of Reader, being able to leave comments on posts and see what other people were reading. I am aware thereis a payment level on Feedly that allows one to do something similar,  but I am in the early stages of making my work profitable in some form so such expenditure is out of the question at this stage and by its nature one would be only interacting with a small, exclusive commmunity.

Bloglovin seem to be, at this stage, to have the potential of having a simile sharing platform to Reader. You can follow, comment and collate blog posts into collections of particular subjects which echoes the nature of Flipboard. And it all links to your profile and your own blog. Theref providing a potential for a great network of blogs, people, connections and recommendations to those of a similar mind and compulsions.

I recommend giving it a try and please follow me there to see what I get up to.

Blue Planet 2 Prequel

Yesterday BBC Earth released the “Prequel” for the forthcoming Blue Planet 2. It features the title sequence we have been working on at BDH.

 

 

Radiohead rerecorded their track “Bloom” (originally written about the first series of Blue Planet) with series composer Hans Zimmer especially for the occasion.

Here is Radiohead performing Bloom live back in 2011.

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Snapseed

This is my variable collection of things I’ve read, seen and heard on that internet.

The weather’s turned (see above) so we have gone straight to autumn here in the UK but it does mean we get to have fires and other autumn delights.

Most of this post is automated so it doesn’t take long to assemblt once I have bookmarked things.

Hope it’s of use.

Continue reading

Intermittently Regular #365 Sketch Project Update 172-182

It’s been a while so I am all out of sorts with drawings and order etc.

This is a batch from our Spring trip to Berlin. I have some more of these and I will post them in due course as some of them were scribbled on site and need a little bit of finishing off.

There’s some good advice here on drawing animals by Aaron Blaise, which could be applied to drawing from life of any kind. Mainly:

  • Draw from Life
  • Do your research before you go out.
  • Bring the right supplies and be prepared.
  • Observe first draw later.
  • Keep it loose and make quick observations.
  • Adjust revise your proportions as you go.
  • Take lots of pictures and build your personal reference library.

You should definitely read the whole post here.

Anyways, back to Berlin:

 

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172/365 People from above. Mall of Berlin, near Potsdamer Platz. 5 mins. Notebook: Artemis
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175/365 Page of room details from the apartment we stayed in Berlin. Various times. Wilmersdorf, Berlin. April 2017 Notebook: Ichabod.
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177/365 FluxBau, from across the Spree. Köpenicker Str. Berlin. 13 April 2017

During out stay we were fortunate enough to visit the Rudolf Belling exhibition at the Hamberger Bahnhof museum. I was relatively unfamiliar with his work before this but we all really enjoyes seeing his work.

This from Wikipedia:

At the very beginning of the 20th century Rudolf Belling’s name was something like a battlecry. The composer of the “Dreiklang” (triad) evoked frequent and hefty discussions. He was the first, who took up again thoughts of the famous Italian sculptor Benvenuto Cellini (1500-1570), who, at his time, stated, that a sculpture should show several good views. These were the current assumptions at the turn of the century. However they foreshadow an indication of sculpture being three-dimensional.

Rudolf Belling amplified: a sculpture should show only good views. And so he became an opponent to one of the German head scientists of art in Berlin, Adolf von Hildebrandt, who, in his book, The problem of Form in Sculpture (1903) said: “Sculpture should be comprehensible – and should never force the observer to go round it”. Rudolf Belling disproved the current theories with his works.

His theories of space and form convinced even critics like Carl Einstein and Paul Westheim, and influenced generations of sculptors after him. It is just this point which isn’t evident enough today.

I hope to make a more comprehensive post about his work in the future.

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178/365 Porträt Geheimrat Dr. Kerschensteiner, Bronze 1932 by Rudolf Belling. “Der Münchner Mathematiker und Reformpëdagoge Georg Kerschenstwiner (1854-1932) gilt als Begründer der Arbeitsschull, einer Vorform der heutigen Berufsschule.” 5 mins. V-ball. 14th April 2017 Hamberger Bahnhoff. Notebook: Ichabod
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179/365 Rudolf Belling Schuttblume 1972 Olympiaberg Muenchen. V-ball & Pencil. Hamberger Bahnhoff. 17th April 2017 Notebook: Ichabod
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180/365 Various rushed studies of “Kopf In Messing (Toni Freeden)” by Rudolph Belling as it was in situ at the Hamberger Bahnhoff Gallery in Berlin, with postcard of the artist with the original. 17th April 2017 Notebook:Ichabod.
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182/365 Rendition of Soldier Sculpture by Rudolf Belling. From the “Skulpturen Und Architekturen” exhibition at Nationalgalerie Hamburger Bahnahof Berlin. Fountain Pen and pencil. 14th April 2017 Notebook: Ichabod.

“What was the comics scene like in Argentina…”

“..in this period in the 1950s and early ’60s? You were there with all these people I’ve already mentioned along with Oscar Zàrate and so many others. From reading about it, it feels like this was a really creative and dynamic time.”

munoz

– “Yes, it was a paradise. There were different languages, backgrounds, cultural viewpoints that were circulating around and trading funny and/or tragic stories with each other. The stories mixed together fluidly, spontaneously, through films, historietas, literature, and radio. There, reality and imaginative fiction and other fantastical stories came together to produce an intimate mix that, it seems to me, encouraged us greatly. We lived near, and in, the wide open spaces of the Argentine pampa lowlands, something that needed us to fill it with stories. I and others believed that everything that we read, watched, and listened to was happening to us, was happening there. Parallel realities leapt out from the pages and the screens into our surroundings, into our souls. Argentina tried, but did not fully succeed, in making immigrants forget their pasts. And Buenos Aires was infused with a cosmopolitan atmosphere; we were and we could be, anywhere. Calé, Arlt, Ferro, Borges, Solano López, Hudson, Dickens, Bradbury, Monicelli, Bergman, Bioy Casares, Oesterheld, Breccia, Pratt, Roume, Chandler – they all spoke to us of Buenos Aires, of Argentina, and of the world that surrounded us from the pampa to Irkutsk, being everywhere all at once. I suppose it was the same in New York. I imagine it that way as well, feverish.”

José Antonio Muñoz