Project Ethel (27.05.14 – 07.01.16): Pages 27-32

Notebook Ethel, Spread Twenty-Seven. Notes and workings for particle interactions on a surface in Autodesk Maya. 🌊 🔬 💥
Notebook Ethel, Spread Twenty-Seven. Notes and workings for particle interactions on a surface in Autodesk Maya. 🌊 🔬 💥
riggingOne
Notebook Ethel, Spread Twenty-Eight. Mind map in rigging, to help understanding of animation process ahead of projects with prehistoric reconstruction. 🕷 🦕 📓
Notebook Ethel, Spread twenty-nine. Garbage writing, cars in car parks and the view from the rear window at South Parade. 🚗 ✍️ 📓
Notebook Ethel, Spread twenty-nine. Garbage writing, cars in car parks and the view from the rear window at South Parade. 🚗 ✍️ 📓
Notebook Ethel, Spread Thirty. Garbage writing, unfinished Fudge story with thumb nail illustrations. ✍️🖼💀
Notebook Ethel, Spread Thirty. Garbage writing, unfinished Fudge story with thumb nail illustrations. ✍️🖼💀

Notebook Ethel, Spread Thirty-One. Garbage writing, short stories and illustrations. 👹 ✍️ 📓
Notebook Ethel, Spread Thirty-One. Garbage writing, short stories and illustrations. 👹 ✍️ 📓
Notebook Ethel, Spread Thirty-Two.
Mind map on rigging models in Maya and drawing of snacking child (artist included).
🧒 🕷 📓

The Codex Rotundus

Great Post on the Codex Rotundus from Book Addiction UK:

Book Addiction

Codex Rotundus 3 fac

The manuscripts and codices which survive from the late 15th century are often large and lavish affairs and usually conform to certain norms in terms of shape. But this curious and unusual little gem, which takes its name ‘Codex Rotundus’ from its unique shape, measures just over 9 centimeters across and is circular.  Its 266 pages are bound along a spine just 3cm long, so small that three clasps are needed to help keep it closed.  Thought to have been rebound in the 17th century, the original clasps which help hold the tiny codex together, were reused. As so many of the manuscripts from this period, it is a devotional text -a lavishly illuminated Book of Hours in Latin and French.

Codex Rotundus 1 fac

Remnants of a coat of arms, which a subsequent owner appears seems to have tried to obliterate, in the first initial ‘D’ suggests that it was created for Adolf of Cleves…

View original post 253 more words

Codex Mendoza (1542)


Codex Mendoza (1542)


Codex Mendoza (1542)

Codex Mendoza (1542)

Codex Mendoza (1542)


Codex Mendoza (1542)


Codex Mendoza (1542)

“The Codex Mendoza is an Aztec codex, created about twenty years after the Spanish conquest of Mexico with the intent that it be seen by Charles V, the Holy Roman Emperor and King of Spain. It contains a history of the Aztec rulers and their conquests, a list of the tribute paid by the conquered, and a description of daily Aztec life, in traditional Aztec pictograms with Spanish explanations and commentary. It is named after Antonio de Mendoza, then the viceroy of New Spain, who may have commissioned it. After creation in Mexico City, it was sent by ship to Spain. The fleet, however, was attacked by French privateers, and the codex, along with the rest of the booty, was taken to France. There it came into the possession of André Thévet, cosmographer to King Henry II of France. Thévet wrote his name in five places on the codex, twice with the date 1553. It was later bought by the Englishman Richard Hakluyt for 20 French francs. Some time after 1616 it was passed to Samuel Purchase, then to his son, and then to John Selden. The codex was deposited into the Bodleian Library at Oxford University in 1659, 5 years after Selden’s death, where it remained in obscurity until 1831, when it was rediscovered by Viscount Kingsborough and brought to the attention of scholars.”

from Wikipedia and ThePublicDomainReview

via Radimus

 

“The Amphitheater of Eternal Knowledge,” Hamburg, 1595.


“The Amphitheater of Eternal Knowledge,” Hamburg, 1595.


“The Amphitheater of Eternal Knowledge,” Hamburg, 1595.


“The Amphitheater of Eternal Knowledge,” Hamburg, 1595.


“The Amphitheater of Eternal Knowledge,” Hamburg, 1595.

“The images, in other words, invite the viewer to engage in a meditation on the nature of the universe and on the links between the earthly and the divine, the corporeal and the spiritual. Of course, such a statement would be equally true of many other instances of early modern alchemical and Hermetic symbolism. I suspect that a lot of the meaning in these images and the text that accompanies them has actually been lost, due to the fact that alchemical practice depended upon face-to-face interactions (like the one between John Dee and Khunrath) which were never recorded. And this was precisely what was intended – the true secrets of early modern alchemy were intended for a small number of the “elect” and were elaborately concealed in complex and often inscrutable language when they were allowed into printed works.”

Benjamin Breen

see more on his excellent blog post.

The Timbuktu Manuscripts 13C+

timbuktu-manuscripts-astronomy-tables

Timbuktu Manuscripts or (Tombouctou Manuscripts) is a blanket term for the large number of historically important manuscripts that have been preserved for centuries in private households in Timbuktu, Mali. The collections include manuscripts about art, medicine, philosophy, and science, as well as priceless copies of the Quran. The number of manuscripts in the collections has been estimated as high as 700,000.

loc_timbuktu_manuscripts_amm0001rs

The majority of manuscripts were written in Arabic, but many were also in local languages, including Manding, Songhay and Tamasheq. The dates of the manuscripts ranged between the late 13th and the early 20th centuries (i.e., from the Islamisation of the Mali Empire until the decline of traditional education in French Sudan). Their subject matter ranged from scholarly works to short letters. The manuscripts were passed down in Timbuktu families and were mostly in poor condition.[4] Most of the manuscripts remain unstudied and uncatalogued, and their total number is unknown, affording only rough estimates. A selection of about 160 manuscripts from the Mamma Haidara Library in Timbuktu and the Ahmed Baba collection were digitized by the Tombouctou Manuscripts Project in the 2000s.

timbuktu-manuscripts-astronomy-mathematics

With the demise of Arabic education in Mali under French colonial rule, appreciation for the medieval manuscripts declined in Timbuktu, and many were being sold off. Time magazine related the account of an imam who picked up four of them for $50 each. In October 2008 one of the households was flooded, destroying 700 manuscripts.

from Wikipedia via Muslim Culture

Notes, writing, diagrams, and index symbols by Walter Benjamin


Walter Benjamin notes


Walter Benjamin notes


Walter Benjamin notes


Walter Benjamin notes


Walter Benjamin notes


Walter Benjamin notes


Walter Benjamin notes


Walter Benjamin notes


Walter Benjamin notes


Walter Benjamin notes

(source)

reblogging austinkleon:

Alan Wall’s reflections on Benjamin:

“Of all writers Benjamin was the most aware of the technologies that made writing possible. Although there had been ‘reservoir pens’ of one sort or another for centuries, the nineteenth century delivered the first true fountain pens (and a little later ball-point pens). These eliminated the need for the nib to be kept in close proximity to an inkpot, thus making the activity of writing more itinerant. And Benjamin was certainly an itinerant writer, writing in apartments, libraries, cafes and bars. He carried his pens and his notebooks around, as he often did copies of some of the images that most engaged him. He was a mobile intelligence unit moving through the streets of a city. ”

On his notation system for The Arcades Project:

“[Benjamin] attempted “to integrate the principle of the montage as an epistemological technique.” Color charts, schemata, and diagrams act as guiding principles to navigate the thicket of excerpts and quotations. Benjamin’s personal color-coding shows an attempt to make order within the vast constellation of his own notes—a tension between an impulse toward structure and the potential of the open field of his interests.”

Paul Thek: Notebooks

Thek [was] an avid keeper of journals, producing over a hundred between 1969 and 1980. Complex and varied, the journals form an intimate and often intense portrait of an energetic mind. Most are written in ordinary school notebooks, with routine accounts of Thek’s days punctuated by emotionally raw passages of self-reflection, analysis of his closest (and, at times, most troubled) personal relationships, and as time progressed, evidence of a growing paranoia. In perfect script, he copied page after page of writings that he admired by Saint Augustine, Ananda K. Coomaraswamy, William Blake, and others. Copying was clearly a meditation for him, a spiritual exercise and, as such, an antidote to anxiety and to what he knew was his own pettiness and anger. But the journals are full of moments of joyful exuberance and artistic bravura as well: celebrations of sex, silly word games, and a range of visual expression, from simple marks and comic sketches to intimate, exquisite watercolors of the sea.”

Adriaen Coenen’s Fish Book (1580)


Adriaen Coenen’s Fish Book (1580)


Adriaen Coenen’s Fish Book (1580)


Adriaen Coenen’s Fish Book (1580)


Adriaen Coenen’s Fish Book (1580)


Adriaen Coenen’s Fish Book (1580)

“Selected double-page spreads from Adriaen Coenen’s Visboek (Fish Book), an epic 800+ page tome on all things fish and fish-related. Coenen began work on this unique book in 1577, at the age of 63, and in three years gathered an unprecedented amount of information on the sea and its coasts, coastal waters, fishing grounds and marine animals. The information was largely gathered in the course of Coenen’s daily work in the Dutch sea-side village of Scheveningen as a fisherman and fish auctioneer and, later on, as wreck master of Holland (allowing him access to every strange creature that washed ashore). Coenen was also a well respected authority in academic circles and used this reputation to receive learned works on the sea from The Hague and Leiden, copied extracts from which find their way into his Fish Book.”

Public Domain Review