“O Stella – Dress – Hair” by PJ Harvey (1992)

 

The band relocated to London in June 1991 when Harvey applied to study sculpture at Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design, still undecided as to her future career. During this time, the band recorded a set of demo recordings and distributed them to record labels. Independent label Too Pure agreed to release the band’s debut single “Dress” in October 1991, and later signed PJ Harvey. “Dress” received mass critical acclaim upon its release and was voted Single of the Week in Melody Maker by guest reviewer John Peel, who admired “the way Polly Jean seems crushed by the weight of her own songs and arrangements, as if the air is literally being sucked out of them … admirable if not always enjoyable.” However, Too Pure provided little promotion for the single and critics claim that “Melody Maker had more to do with the success of the “Dress” single than Too Pure Records.” A week after its release, the band recorded a live radio session for Peel on BBC Radio 1 on 29 October featuring “Oh, My Lover”, “Victory”, “Sheela-Na-Gig” and “Water”.”

See Also  (<<– i was actually at this particular gig)

5,500-Year-Old Sumerian Star Map Of Ancient Nineveh and the Observation Of Köfels’ Impact Event

“For over 150 years scientists have tried to solve the mystery of a controversial cuneiform clay tablet that indicates the so-called Köfel’s impact event was observed in ancient times. The circular stone-cast tablet was recovered from the 650 BC underground library of King Ashurbanipal in Nineveh, Iraq in the late 19th century. Long thought to be an Assyrian tablet, computer analysis has matched it with the sky above Mesopotamia in 3300 BC and proves it to be of much more ancient Sumerian origin. The tablet is an “Astrolabe,” the earliest known astronomical instrument. It consists of a segmented, disk-shaped star chart with marked units of angle measure inscribed upon the rim.”

 

“City of Tiny Lites” – Frank Zappa (1979ish)

Just been introducing the younger folk at work to some old school claymation, the work of the mighty Bruce Bickford.

“Bickford was a Vietnam veteran whose love for animation sprung out his crude home movies. His earliest experiments involved toy cars, but a need to populate these rough little films led to the creation of tiny clay figures. Soon enough he was letting his imagination spill out with strange, ever-morphing stream of consciousness tales that seemed to revolve around demons and animal heads, hamburgers and pizzas, treacherous landscapes and excessive violence – “danger and weirdness”, in Bickford’s own words. Audiences were given an early taste when The Old Grey Whistle Test aired a portion of ‘City Of Tiny Lights’ with animated accompaniment in 1979. Baby Snakes made its debut during the Christmas of that year, containing more examples and a peak of behind-the-scenes amidst the concert footage.”

Anthony Nield