The Schrift-Landschaften drawings by Herbert Pföstl

“The Schrift-Landschaften drawings are composed of a single text-fragment, written in Herbert Pföstl’s distinctly small script, inscribed upon a page from a nautical traverse table. One is reminded of the particularities of calligraphic expression and the meditative processes required to create needlework samplers, chronological tables, weather diaries, or even telegraphic code. Pföstl’s landscapes of script, however, come from a deep reading of and reliance upon literature; these lines are fragments from books gathered over many years and transformed into a landscape of incantations for the artist. What at first appears a wilderness of words on paper soon resolves into a garland of vows concealed within the text. These works are a meditation on the artist’s abiding interest in the liminal space which often exists between drawing and writing.”

Epidote Press

More in Codex:

Margaret Macdonald, “The White Rose and the Red Rose”, 1902

“She exhibited with Mackintosh at the 1900 Vienna Secession, where she was an influence on the Secessionists Gustav Klimt and Josef Hoffmann. They continued to be popular in the Viennese art scene, both exhibiting at the Viennese International Art Exhibit in 1909.”

 

“Mackintosh did not keep sketchbooks, which reflects her reliance on imagination rather than on nature. A few sources provided significant inspiration for her works, including the Bible, the Odyssey, poems by Morris and Rossetti, and the works of Maurice Maeterlinck. Her works, along with those works of her often collaborating sister, defied her contemporaries’ conceptions of art. Gleeson White wrote, “With a delightfully innocent air these two sisters disclaim any attempt to acknowledge that Egyptian decoration has interested them specially. ‘We have no basis.’ Nor do they advance any theory.” The beginning of her artistic career reflects broad strokes of experimentation. Largely drawing from her imagination, she reinterpreted traditional themes, allegories, and symbols in inventive ways. For instance, immediately following the 1896 opening of her Glasgow studio with her sister, she transformed broad ideas such as “Time” and “Summer” into highly stylized human forms. Many of her works incorporate muted natural tones, elongated nude human forms, and a subtle interplay between geometric and natural motifs. Above all, her designs demonstrated a type of originality that distinguishes her from other artists of her time.”

Wiki

”The Eyes of Orson Welles” by Mark Cousins (2018)

Just caught up with the Mark Cousins film, “The Eyes of Orson Welles”, a personal and expansive love letter to Welles himself.

The film shows many drawings by Welles, something I had not previously seen, it really builds an understanding of how he saw his ideas and the world around him.

It’s an unusual documentary with hardly any talking head interviews or people in frame at all really, unless they are drawn or filmed by Welles himself. But it touches on the nature of drawing, film making, film making as drawing, cameras as pens, calligraphy, notebooks, writing and creativity in all its forms, something Welles engaged with his whole life.

I don’t think it’s on the iPlayer anymore but there is a website here that has various links to different ways of seeing it.

On Base and Superstructure

A great thread here on artist production and it’s place in the modern world. Worth reading the whole lot (click on through). 🔽🔽🔽

Tumblr Closedown

This is cross posted form my Tumblr:

This is officially my last post here, this was my first.

I will stop actively using Tumblr as of the 17th Dec 2018.

I object to Tumblr’s years of benefiting and gaining trust from the artistic community to then go on and remove and destroy a decades worth of work, archives and culture with impunity.

I have decided not to completely delete my page here, most of what I have posted is not at risk from being removed by the algorithm, and, besides, I am still proud of the tens of thousands of posts I have collected.

Tumblr was the first place I felt truly at home on the internet and I have found many excellent friends and collaborators through it. I am currently working hard to make sure I am following all of you/them elsewhere, preferably with RSS, but with whatever form they find most suits them.

Life goes on and I have been maintaining a blog over on WordPress for many years, it has two parts, one that showcases my own work & history and another that is much more like the scrapbook style of blogging I have been pursuing here collecting and collating things I find.

Both parts of the blog are at paulgreer.net/blog, you are very welcome to come and find me there and explore, I am active most days.

I am also very active on Twitter (@burningfp), Instagram (@burningfp) and Pinterest (@burningfp).

Pages at Facebook (@burningfp),  Ello (@burningfp), Mastodon (@paulgreer) update less frequently, but I am working on it.

I would like to thank everyone that has made using this site the magical, empowering and life changing experience it has been for me, and I wish all of you the very best for the future.

Kind regards,

Paul

Making Infinity Comprehensible – Eco

“The list is the origin of culture. It’s part of the history of art and literature. What does culture want? To make infinity comprehensible. It also wants to create order — not always, but often. And how, as a human being, does one face infinity? How does one attempt to grasp the incomprehensible? Through lists, through catalogs, through collections in museums and through encyclopedias and dictionaries. There is an allure to enumerating how many women Don Giovanni slept with: It was 2,063, at least according to Mozart’s librettist, Lorenzo da Ponte. We also have completely practical lists — the shopping list, the will, the menu — that are also cultural achievements in their own right.”

Umberto Eco

other lists:

‘He was one of the hanging judges of art.’

“My aim is to be understood by everyone. I reject the ‘depth’ that people demand nowadays, into which you can never descend without a diving bell crammed with cabbalistic bullshit and intellectual metaphysics. This expressionistic anarchy has got to stop … A day will come when the artist will no longer be this bohemian, puffed-up anarchist but a healthy man working in clarity within a collectivist society.”

George Grosz

via Daily Omnivore